Bristech Conference 2016 programme - talks

TALKS | WORKSHOPS

Short version >>

0830
to
0900

Registration and Networking

Grab a tea or coffee and enjoy the build-up to the event.

 


0900
to
0915

Welcome to Bristech

Nic Hemley

A warm welcome from the co-founder of Bristech

 


Waterside 3 (WS3)

0930
to
1020

Create the right product! What happens before wireframing?

Carl Bettag and Dave Ellender

What can design do aside from wireframing and visual design? Learn about established processes and techniques that can be deployed to understand business and user needs, and check that the product is on target before the budget is spent on design, coding, training & rollout.

 

Cinema 1

0930
to
1020

HTTPS Is Not Enough

Tim Perry

The web is moving slowly towards HTTPS everywhere but even now man-in-the-middle attacks are still astoundingly effective and easy to do. In this talk you’ll see how to beat HTTPS on many major websites, and discover the tools required to secure your own applications and keep your users safe.

 

Cinema 3

0930
to
1020

Data + Docker = Discombobulating?

Steph Locke

Data should live forever. Docker containers should be constantly killed and reborn. How do you match up these two opposing requirements to do data persistence in a docker environment?

 

 


Waterside 3 (WS3)

1030
to
1120

Linking Data on the Web

Jen Williams

We introduce the key concepts behind Linked Data - a better way of sharing data on the web using standard web technologies. We will talk about the limitations of publishing data in spreadsheet form and show that the step up from flat data to semantic data is easier than you might think.

 

Cinema 1

1030
to
1120

How does a PaaS actually work?

Alex Ley

Have you ever wondered what it takes for a Cloud platform (PaaS) to be able to deploy your application and keep it running? Come join us for a journey through Cloud Foundry, the leading Open Source cloud application runtime.

 

Cinema 3

1030
to
1120

Murphy vs Satan: Why programming secure systems is still hard

Rod Chapman

Why does it seem that programming secure systems is so hard? What can we learn from safety-critical systems developers? How can their approach be deployed in a more Agile and fast-moving enviroment? This talk will give a safety-critical developer’s view of the state of developing secure systems…

 


Refreshments


Waterside 3 (WS3)

1150
to
1240

An Identity Manifesto - what it is & why we need one

Simon Moffatt

Everyone has a digital identity and hopefully still have control over it. Access to most online services today, will require one and at its most complex, a huge array of attributes, containing highly personal data, preferences, history, associations and more. The Identity Manifesto is an open source framework upon which identity and access management programmes can be compared. This talk will focus on the 12 key components application developers should focus up when building services that require user and device interactions.

 

Cinema 1

1150
to
1240

Avoiding Release Paralysis

Andrew Martin

Continuous Deployment is a powerful vehicle to carry code to production, but its complexity can dissuade risk-averse teams. This talk describes lessons learned in continuously deploying Node.js applications in Docker, and demonstrates how those lessons can be applied with examples.

 

Cinema 3

1150
to
1240

The Nim programming language

Fred Heath

In the current wave of new system programming languages, Nim stands out with a combination of flexibility, expressiveness, elegance and raw power. I will introduce you to Nim’s features, its use-cases and I’ll explain why you should stand up and take note of this great new language.

 


LUNCH


Waterside 3 (WS3)

1340
to
1430

Beyond Testing: Application Security in the Age of DevOps

Tim Jarrett

Securing applications is hard; doing it in DevOps, with mere minutes between developer check-in and deployment, may seem impossible. We talk about organizational, process and technology innovations that take advantage of DevOps principles to help organizations build applications securely.

 

Cinema 1

1340
to
1430

Haskell On Rails

Jezen Thomas

Talk is about motivations for wanting smarter tools and how the current software best practices place the onus on the developer to be disciplined. I’ll talk about the Nix ecosystem and Haskell’s Yesod framework, which is somewhat similar to Rails. Audience will be inspired to try Haskell and Nix.

 

Cinema 3

1340
to
1430

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Redux

Sam Hogarth

Redux is a library that is gaining rapid traction in the JavaScript development community for all the right reasons. It’s “this changes everything” caliber. The Hitchhikers Guide to Redux will present you with a glimpse of the future of front-end development, from a beginner’s point of view.

 


Waterside 3 (WS3)

1440
to
1530

Designing, Developing and Running IoT solutions at Scale

Andrew Nesling

The Dyson Connectivity team design, develop and run engaging connected product solutions which are scaling rapidly to meet the global demand. Andy will discuss approaches to the various challenges of scaling an IoT platform, extending our products user interface globally, leveraging a distributed team and moving towards a future of continuous delivery

 

Cinema 1

1440
to
1530

Delightful UX for Distributed Systems

Mike North

In a distributed system, the complexity around consistency, connectivity & concurrency make it a real challenge to build a user experience that “wows”. To make matters wore, usually we end up using more than one programming language. It’s easy to see the importance of a great plan and mental model.

 

Cinema 3

1440
to
1530

Data explosion, energy restrictions, security and optics

Susanne Klein

In the year 2020 the ‘Digital Universe’ is predicted to reach 44 ZB, 10 times the amount of data which is floating around today. Hewlett Packard Enterprise is researching into a new architecture of computers to increase performance and decrease power consumption. Optics will play an important role.

 


Refreshments


Waterside 3 (WS3)

1555
to
1645

Idiomatic Elixir by example

Claudio Ortolina

Elixir is growing in popularity day by day. Many developers are approaching it with prior patterns and knowledge, building software that works but that doesn’t leverage many features of Erlang and its BEAM runtime. In this talk we’ll go through some examples and learn how to write great Elixir code.

 

Cinema 1

1555
to
1645

Engineering an acquisition

Dan Fairs

Founding a technology startup, running it and then exiting is an exciting but often stressful adventure. This talk will cover my experience of the process, and you'll learn some strategies to both increase the likelihood of success and to make the process easier. Please note: results are not guaranteed, and your mileage may vary

 

Cinema 3

1555
to
1645

In your face : WebVR is here

Shaun Dunne

Question: Who likes VR? Answer: Everyone! But its not just for gaming. We can build new and exciting VR experiences and have them work in the browser. VR might just be the next step for consuming content and we can start right here, right now.

 


1645
to
1700

Closing Goodbye

Nic Hemley